“At Blacksheep we have always sought to design differently.”

Tim Mutton
30.10.2020

It is a complex time of significant transformation stemming from global shifts in circumstances. As a design industry leader, what are you doing differently to ensure your work is relevant and appropriate for today’s market?

 

At Blacksheep we have always sought to design differently. We have spent the last 18 years creating and tailoring guest experiences that challenge the norm, avoiding similarity to help hospitality brands evolve, stand out and grow.

It feels that everything that was subject to change in our lives has been sped up significantly due to the pandemic. These include the stark reality of our negative impact on nature, technology’s ability to transform social spaces and workplaces, and the fragility of our health and livelihoods.

Our specialism has always been in hospitality, which has been disrupted beyond anyone’s imagination, from the loss of businesses, trade and jobs to our ability to freely enjoy flying, eating out, holidays, cruises and hotels. However, we feel this is an opportunity to positively reset our approach towards future guest hospitality spatial experiences.

 

When the world begins to open back up, we will find guests wants, needs and desires will have shifted. The matter of security and health will be paramount. Our choice in materiality, use and products should allow for greater confidence in these matters. Materials that are inherently self-cleaning, touchless or even healing will be the new necessity.

 

We foresee a future where technology, AI and data pay a much bigger part in our interiors. Spaces that predetermine our mood, emotions and needs. For example, lighting that changes to enhance mental wellness with room tactility enhancements in line with what your smart device determines.

Our relationships with spaces will evolve as we shun working in glass box offices to avoid the daily commute and replace shopping in malls to online purchasing. Greater blurring between physical spaces and the natural world will see some very exciting developments of outside spaces. They will become more desirable, becoming the places to be and dwell. We crave for greater spatial life balance by having to compensate for additional time in our digital spaces.

Read the full article featured in IFI here